Dog Identification ~ a MUST Have!

Everyday I receive an electronic newsletter called “Nextdoor”. Many neighborhoods around the country have this. What I find distressing in my neighborhood is the amount of Lost Dog or Found Dog notifications there are.

Dogs can be great escape artists to even the most watchful Dog Parent (unfortunately I know from first hand experience). Thankfully there are several easy ways to help your dog get returned for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One is obviously an ID Tag that attaches to the dogs collar. There are several cute styles available and all that is needed is the dogs name and your cell phone number.

Another is to make sure your dog is micro-chipped. Micro-chipping can be done by your veterinarian. With a micro-chip, you don’t have to worry about your dogs collar, and therefore their ID tag, coming off. A found dog can be taken to a veterinary office to be scanned and easily returned to their Dog Parent.

The third option is to license your dog with the state and attach the license to the dogs collar. Again a found dogs license number can be called in and contact information for the dog parents can be obtained. Assuring that the dog is returned to its home.

It is also important to know that if your dog ends up in a shelter, the shelter does check for ID Tags and micro-chipping.

I personally use all three forms of ID, the ID tag, License, and micro-chip. I will never forget the time when my Old English Sheepdog Sir Winston Thomas got out through the backyard gate. This was before cell-phones so his ID tag had my home phone number and address on it. Thank Goodness! I will never forget the sight of two very pretty blonde young ladies driving a white sports car with Winston sitting in-between them! They had tried calling me, then when I didn’t answer my phone, realized that I was out looking for him. Having my address, they were able to drive him home…back to me! I was sooo very happy to see him and extremely grateful to those ladies.

Make sure your Fur Baby can be returned to their home. Make sure that there is a way that you can be contacted when someone finds your dog!

Doggy Ice Cream!

A great cool treat for your dog during the summer is Doggy Ice Cream!

I found a very simple recipe, that even I can make, that my dog Nathan literally jumps for joy over!

32 oz Plain Yogurt                                                                                               1 Cup Creamy Peanut Butter                                                                               3 Bananas sliced

Blend all three ingredients together until smooth. Pour into ice cube trays and freeze.

That’s it!

Now how about an ice cream party for people and dogs?!

Beware of Heat Stroke in Dogs

Summer is here, so PLEASE take care of your dogs!

In several areas of the country, the temperatures are soaring to breaking record highs. Due to this Dog Parents need to be careful when taking their Fur Babies in car rides and out for walks.

Leaving your pet inside a car while you run into a store no matter how short of time, is an absolute No-No!!! Even with the windows cracked, the temperatures inside a car can sky-rocket fast! Here are the signs to watch out for. Remember, if it is too hot for you to walk barefoot outside, it is too hot for your pets!

Image Courtesy of Scottsdale Hills Animal Hospital

Dog fur is great protection against the cold but can be a problem in hot weather. This is because, unlike humans, dogs eliminate heat by panting. When panting isn’t enough, their body temperature rises. This can be fatal if not corrected quickly.

What To Watch For

Excessive panting and signs of discomfort indicate overheating. However, it is important to be aware of the ambient temperature and take appropriate preventative measures.

Primary Cause

Any hot environment can cause heatstroke, but the most common cause is careless actions such as leaving a dog in a car on a hot day or forgetting to provide shade to an animal kept outdoors.

Immediate Care

It is essential to remove the dog from the hot environment immediately and get immediate veterinary attention. Heatstroke can cause unseen problems, such as swelling of the brain, kidney failure, and abnormal clotting of blood. On the way to the veterinarian, travel with the windows open and the air conditioner on.

If veterinary care is not immediately possible, the following guidelines will help. If the dog is unconscious, make sure no water enters the nose or mouth as you follow these guidelines. Also, do not give the dog aspirin to lower its temperature; this can lead to other problems.

  1. Put your dog in the bath tub.
  2. Run a cool (not cold) shower over your pet, covering the whole body — especially the back of the head and neck.
  3. Allow the water to fill up the bathtub as you shower the dog. Keep the head elevated to prevent aspiration pneumonia.
  4. If getting the dog into the tub is impractical, use a garden hose to cool the dog or place him in a pool of cool water.
  5. Apply a cold pack to the dog’s head to help lower his body temperature — a packet of frozen vegetables works fine.
  6. Massage the legs. A vigorous rubbing helps the dog’s circulation and reduces the risks of shock.
  7. Let the dog drink as much cool or cold water as it wants. Adding a pinch of salt to the water bowl will help the dog replace the minerals it lost through panting.

The best medicine is to not allow your dog to get into this situation. As mentioned before, do not leave your dog in a car. Do not take them for walks when it is hot. Do not leave your dog outside without shade or water. Remember, your dog depends on you to give them a good life.

*Heat Stroke information provided by Petmd.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Survive the Loss of Your Dog

During my adult life, I have always been a proud Dog Mom. The heartbreaking part of being a Dog Mom is mourning their passing. Each time was very difficult for me. In the April Blog, we discussed why it is so difficult to lose a dog, but how do you get through it? Obviously everyone is going to experience grief differently. Therefore going through the process of mourning is also going to be different for everyone.

Personally what I have found to help me is to create a memory quilt. Favorite photos can be transferred onto fabric and there is a wide selection of cute dog related prints to chose from. You can notate the number of years of their life using cute buttons or beads, small flowers, rhinestones, or anything else. Their ID tag can even be used on the quilt. Pictured below are a couple of different memory quilts I made. As you can see they are both very different, due to the personalities of the dogs. The one on the left is for Angus. He was very fun and had a silly personality. The other is for Lacy. She was such a princess, and of course I had to use a lace fabric due to her name!

Sir Angus’s Memorial Quilt

 

 

Lady Lacy Marie’s Memorial Quilt

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can ask your Veterinarian to make a plaster-of-paris paw print of your dogs paw. A small keepsake that is sooo personal and means so very much. If the opportunity exists, it is very easy to create a stepping stone using your dogs paw prints. Just get a stepping stone kit from a craft store. There are beautiful statues that you can have your dogs name engraved on. Keeping it in a special place in your home or garden can bring you peace every time you see it. Placing it in your dogs favorite napping spot could very well bring you smiles.

A lot of people turn to their religion for comfort during the mourning period. This beautiful prayer was written for the passing of a dog by a friend of mine.

“If the last is first,                                                                                                                       and peacemakers are blessed,                                                                                             then your place is at the foot                                                                                                    of whatever angel meets us all                                                                                             when we climb the stairs to                                                                                                     where you’ll be.

Cherubims aside,                                                                                                                    there is no heaven without friends                                                                                whose four legs have walked                                                                                                the rocky roads                                                                                                                              that we have known and                                                                                              stumbled on.

Let the saints                                                                                                                                do their work as well                                                                                                                 as you have done yours.”

~ Jody Serey

Another friend of mine created a mourning wreath (very common during the Victorian Era) and placed it on the front door of the house when her dog passed.

It doesn’t matter what you do or don’t do. Whatever it is that will help you through the grieving process is the right thing to do. The most important part is to not let others dictate to you what is right or wrong. Whatever feels right to you, is the best.